Search



Go Back   MustangForums.com > Ford Mustang Tech > 5.0L (1979-1995) Mustang
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?
Search

5.0L (1979-1995) Mustang Technical discussions on 5.0 Liter Mustangs within. This does not include the 5.0 from the 2011 Mustang GT. That information is in the 2005-1011 section.

Sponsored by Weld Racing


Welcome to Mustang Forums!
Welcome to Mustang Forums.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, at no cost, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!


Reply
 
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-25-2006, 11:41 PM   #1
Mustang5.0_GT
3rd Gear Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location:
Posts: 522
Default Checking/adjusting throttle position sensor

I just baught a used 65mm TB , he said just check / adjust throttle position sensor , How do i do that and How do i know what is correct?
This ad is not displayed to registered or logged-in members.
Register your free account today and become a member on Mustang Forums!
__________________
Mustang5.0_GT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2006, 12:00 AM   #2
50Trippin
2nd Gear Member
 
50Trippin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Vehicle: 1989 Ford Mustang Coupe 5.0L SSP
Location: Washington
Posts: 270
Default RE: Checking/adjusting throttle position sensor

92BOOSTED
3rd Gear Member





Posts: 444
Joined: 7/18/2004
Status: offline Did you set the voltage when you put it on?
With the key on engine off, grab a voltage meter and check (i believe) the black and green wires.Black being neg. side.
You can adjust this TPS by the two screws on top.
You want the voltage to be between .96 and .98 volts. You might have to pull it off and open the holes up a little bit to achieve
the desired voltage but it will work better for you.

Rye

_____________________________

92 coupe
S/C engine is no more.
Building now, 351W sportsman block, lightning pistons,
trickflow stage 2 cam, trickflow trackheat heads, performer RPM airgap int, shorty headers, steel billet flywheel, tremec 3550,
Thats all i have so far...
__________________
50Trippin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2006, 12:20 AM   #3
Mustang5.0_GT
3rd Gear Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location:
Posts: 522
Default RE: Checking/adjusting throttle position sensor

thx ... I went to search and it will only let me search back to a month ago .. idk why
__________________
Mustang5.0_GT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2006, 12:44 AM   #4
50Trippin
2nd Gear Member
 
50Trippin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Vehicle: 1989 Ford Mustang Coupe 5.0L SSP
Location: Washington
Posts: 270
Default RE: Checking/adjusting throttle position sensor

no prob. you got me searchin for the answer and i know in the past i've come across many different answers to your question but most of them are very similar. i decided to pull out my "Official Ford 5.0 Mustang Technical Reference & Performance Handbook" and see what that has to say about the TPS. Here is a direct quote from the book.

Throttle Position Sensor
"The throttle position sensor is housed on top of the throttle body. This rotary-potentiometer-based device sends a voltage signal to EEC to indicate the position (and rate of change of position) of the throttle shaft. Ford service literature shows that a five-oh's throttle position sensor's signals range between .6 and 4.585 volts, the lower number indicates that the throttle is closed and the higher signaling wide-open throttle. With the engine off and the ignition key switched on, a digital voltmeter connected across the sensor's wires should read .85-1 volt. At idle, a reading of .98-1 volt is considered desirable for performance service. A TPS setting of 1 volt at idle produces 4.6-4.8 volts at wide-open throttle.

Adjustment involves loosening the pair of screws that attach the sensor to the throttle housing and rotating the sensor until the meter reading is corrected. The meter's positive lead connects to the sensor's green wire and the negative lead goes to the black wire. Due to variations in production equipment, the holes in the sensor housing may require elongation before it becomes possible to obtain the desired reading. For reference, the 1994-1995 TPS uses different-colored wires, and the hold-down holes in the sensor housing are not accessible as on previous models. In July 1989, Ford issued a Technical Service Bulletin covering hard-to-remove throttle position sensor mounting screws."

Courtesy of Al Kirschenbaum
__________________
50Trippin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2006, 01:51 AM   #5
Mustang5.0_GT
3rd Gear Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location:
Posts: 522
Default RE: Checking/adjusting throttle position sensor

Thx alot man , seriously you helped me out so much ...
__________________
Mustang5.0_GT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2006, 01:51 AM
MustangForums
Ford Mustang




Paid Advertisement

 
 
 
Reply

Tags
1989, 351, 50, adjust, adjusting, ford, july, mounting, mustang, position, remove, screws, sensor, throttle, tps

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
bbk tb install and having problems ludastang07 GT S197 General Discussion 38 05-25-2008 12:02 PM

Advertising

Featured Sponsors
Vendor Directory
New Sponsors
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:34 PM.

© Internet Brands, Inc.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

This forum is owned and operated by Internet Brands, Inc., a Delaware corporation. It is not authorized or endorsed by the Ford Motor Company and is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company or its related companies in any way. Ford® is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company
Emails Backup