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Classic Mustangs (Tech) Technical discussions about the Mustangs of yester-year.

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Old 03-05-2012, 09:32 PM   #1
F15Falcon
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Vehicle: 1970 Mach I
Location: Texas
Posts: 67
Default Boxing Lower Control Arms:

Boxing your lower control arms is a cheap and effective way to strengthen the arms for everyday driving or track use. I always box the lower control arms on every Mustang that comes through my shop when I rebuild the front suspension. Here are a few pics I took recently when I did a pair:



Here is the '67 lower control arm I started with, you can see the "nubs" on the lower part of the arm:



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I already had a '70 arm that was sandblasted, so that was the one that I would be plating. The '70 arm does not have the nubs:



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I made a cardboard pattern of the area I would be boxing, and cut it out of some 1/8" thick material. I could have used my plasma cutter, but I went with my default cutting tool, which is a 4 1/2" angle grinder with a cutting wheel:



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The piece I cut out has the notches for the nubs on the '67-'68 style control arms because I used that piece as a pattern to water jet several more boxing plates as I was doing more than one pair:



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The piece required a small "dogleg" bend in it to conform to the shape of the bottom of the control arm. I used a vise and a hammer to make the bend:



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The boxing plate is clamped in place and tack welded. The length of the boxing plate allows the strut rods to be accessed:



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With the plate tacked in place, I start in the middle and skip around welding to prevent too much heat in one place. I also left the old bushing in place for now:



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The last thing to do is to drill a 13/16" hole to allow access for the sway bar end link:



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Here are how the notches fit the '67-'68 control arms:



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Old 03-05-2012, 10:08 PM   #2
Jonk67
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Default

Nice work, I had a buddy do this to my new Moog LCA along with tack welding the bushing so it wouldn't slide. Wish I had the time and skills to add the roller bearings too, maybe on the next tear down.
Jon
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:12 PM   #3
MonsterBilly
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Nice work

WOuld this improve handling at all on a daily driver/street car. i do hang a lot of corners and am trying to get all the improvements i can get get
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Old 03-06-2012, 12:16 AM   #4
F15Falcon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonsterBilly View Post
Nice work

WOuld this improve handling at all on a daily driver/street car. i do hang a lot of corners and am trying to get all the improvements i can get get
I can't say that it would improve handling all by itself, but it definately takes some flex out of the LCA's, which can't be bad. I have seen severe cases where the LCA actually was almost broken in half from years of abuse.
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Old 03-06-2012, 12:16 AM
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1968, 1988, 50, 67, arm, arms, box, boxed, boxing, control, ford, front, lca, length, lower, mustang, plates, room

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