MustangForums.com

MustangForums.com (http://mustangforums.com/forum/index.php)
-   Detailing (http://mustangforums.com/forum/detailing-46/)
-   -   New to polishing (http://mustangforums.com/forum/detailing/696750-new-to-polishing.html)

All4One 06-13-2013 12:57 PM

New to polishing
 
I've always wanted to fix up my paint, but never had anyone to show me how. Picking up some items today to finally get started on it.
Meg's clay bar kit
Ultimate quick detailer
ultimate compound polish
ultra finishing polish
nu finish wax

Will post pics when I finally get around to actually cleaning it.
Anything else I should try instead?

AJ06GT 06-13-2013 01:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by All4One (Post 8230777)
I've always wanted to fix up my paint, but never had anyone to show me how. Picking up some items today to finally get started on it.
Meg's clay bar kit
Ultimate quick detailer
ultimate compound polish
ultra finishing polish
nu finish wax

Will post pics when I finally get around to actually cleaning it.
Anything else I should try instead?

Do you have an actual polisher? Hand polishing will get you no where. And if you've never polished, don't get a roatary polisher. Those can burn the paint really easily.

I do a dish soap wash to strip any old wax, then clay, rewash, then polish, rewash, wax. Not too hard, just takes time.

All4One 06-13-2013 01:18 PM

I've got a polisher, but I'm afraid its not a random. It's a craftsman 6 inch sander/polisher model 315.115030. I may sell it and pick up something new.

AJ06GT 06-13-2013 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by All4One (Post 8230790)
I've got a polisher, but I'm afraid its not a random. It's a craftsman 6 inch sander/polisher model 315.115030. I may sell it and pick up something new.

If it's a sander/polisher, it's probably *rotary. I wouldn't try that on your Mustang if you haven't used one before. You have to get your speed and pressure just right with those or your paint will be toast. I think a lot of people like the Porter Cable DA for an inexpensive polisher. Either way, watch a couple YouTube videos so you get a feel for how fast to go and you should be alright. I would suggest trying on a beater if you have one first though.

Edit: Corrected orbital with rotary, that's what I meant to say!

SON1C 06-13-2013 05:54 PM

IMO

no rotaries

no nu finish

those are weak otc products

I would suggest v32 and m205 by DA ex. griots garage polisher or porter cable etc
5" pads
uww+ at a quick detail ratio, or meg's final inspection, cg speed wipe, adams detail spray etc

mith 06-14-2013 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SON1C (Post 8230965)
IMO
no nu finish

Sonic, I'm off today and was out in the garage smoking. I saw a bottle of, "Nu Finish" that I'd bought. I thought about using it, but after reading this, I think I'll just throw it out since you say it's worthless.

I'll use my Maguire's 2.0 swirl remover which seems to work. However, I need to wash my pads as they're quite dirty. Thanks for the above opinion... again, I'm going to throw out the rest of the Nu Fisnish swirl remover that I bought.

DocSnickers 06-14-2013 01:43 PM

This is a good DVD on proper techniques with using orbitals.
http://www.griotsgarage.com/product/...ortby=ourPicks

mith 06-15-2013 04:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by All4One (Post 8230790)
I've got a polisher, but I'm afraid its not a random. It's a craftsman 6 inch sander/polisher model 315.115030. I may sell it and pick up something new.

Food for thought. I had a motorcycle a while back. I put a $3,000 paint job on it. While in the paint place, I went to check on it's progress. I watched the employees buff it. They didn't have orbitals, nor did they use the other buffers and have the "orbital" motion. They were straight buffers. Now I understand that those people know what they're doing and using a non-orbital type buffer can be hazardous if you don't know what you're doing. Having said that... the fact remains that these professionals were using regular buffers.

I use a regular buffer because I want to get the same results and expect that after trial and error, I'll get the hang of it and will eventually get the same results that they got with my cycle. And so far (after burning through some of my plastic add-ons such as the hood scoop etc.) I'm pleased with my progress. I've almost completely removed all micro-scratches and I'm a noobie who's in the infancy of the learning curve!

So if you're willing to take the plunge... I don't feel there's anything wrong with using a regular grinder/sander type machine as this is exactly what the professionals that did my cycle, used.

Good luck to ya what ever you end up using. Eventually you'll learn how to use it... and hopefully, you don't do any damage to your paint. Just remember, light pressure and slow speeds. Start slow and work your way up until you get the hang of what you're doing to get the best results.

SON1C 06-15-2013 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mith (Post 8231277)
Sonic, I'm off today and was out in the garage smoking. I saw a bottle of, "Nu Finish" that I'd bought. I thought about using it, but after reading this, I think I'll just throw it out since you say it's worthless.

I'll use my Maguire's 2.0 swirl remover which seems to work. However, I need to wash my pads as they're quite dirty. Thanks for the above opinion... again, I'm going to throw out the rest of the Nu Fisnish swirl remover that I bought.

I wouldn't throw it out, simply gift it to someone who's into their car but won't take the time to learn how to care for it better or spend the money to acquire quality products
2.0 isn't a bad product there are just better alternatives available imo

SON1C 06-15-2013 08:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mith (Post 8231681)
Food for thought. I had a motorcycle a while back. I put a $3,000 paint job on it. While in the paint place, I went to check on it's progress. I watched the employees buff it. They didn't have orbitals, nor did they use the other buffers and have the "orbital" motion. They were straight buffers. Now I understand that those people know what they're doing and using a non-orbital type buffer can be hazardous if you don't know what you're doing. Having said that... the fact remains that these professionals were using regular buffers.

I use a regular buffer because I want to get the same results and expect that after trial and error, I'll get the hang of it and will eventually get the same results that they got with my cycle. And so far (after burning through some of my plastic add-ons such as the hood scoop etc.) I'm pleased with my progress. I've almost completely removed all micro-scratches and I'm a noobie who's in the infancy of the learning curve!

So if you're willing to take the plunge... I don't feel there's anything wrong with using a regular grinder/sander type machine as this is exactly what the professionals that did my cycle, used.

Good luck to ya what ever you end up using. Eventually you'll learn how to use it... and hopefully, you don't do any damage to your paint. Just remember, light pressure and slow speeds. Start slow and work your way up until you get the hang of what you're doing to get the best results.

you can use rotaries, but why? DA's are fool proof, you would have already paid for it by the cost of ruining your hoodscoop?
jmo though

mith 06-17-2013 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SON1C (Post 8231746)
you can use rotaries, but why? DA's are fool proof, you would have already paid for it by the cost of ruining your hoodscoop?
jmo though

Well now, you have a valid point... however (said the noobie)... if this is what professionals use, then that's what I'm going to use. If the other buffers worked better, the professionals would use them right?

Now if you're saying that the other buffers (DA's?) work just as well, then I'll reconsider using them.

teetertotter 06-17-2013 04:55 PM

Have someone else do it for you
 
Can you afford to have a professional do it for you once a year. Buy a marine/saltwater quality exterior treatment product and have local detailer do it for you. It will last for a year+ in snow/salt country.

AJ06GT 06-17-2013 05:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mith (Post 8232676)
Well now, you have a valid point... however (said the noobie)... if this is what professionals use, then that's what I'm going to use. If the other buffers worked better, the professionals would use them right?

Now if you're saying that the other buffers (DA's?) work just as well, then I'll reconsider using them.

Well if you want to use a rotary, then go for it. Certainly no one should discourage you as rotaries do work very well. Just know that even when you know how to use it, it just takes one slip up to mess up your paint. It's one thing to learn how to use one and have some success, it's another to have years of experience to know you won't make a mistake. DAs do work just as well on most jobs, but maybe just not as fast. Rotaries are more aggressive so you can do more intensive work faster, but you can also damage easily. If you're just looking to clean up your car and take out some swirls, a DA most definitely works just as well as a rotary. If you do choose to use a rotary I'd seriously suggest you practice on something you don't mind damaging. If it's your first time you can probably count on putting some holograms in your paint.

mith 06-18-2013 07:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SON1C (Post 8231746)
you can use rotaries, but why? DA's are fool proof, you would have already paid for it by the cost of ruining your hoodscoop?
jmo though

Touché! Sonic, you're correct. But I think outside the box on this issue. If you want to learn to drive, you can start with a Pinto and work your way up knowing full well that the Pinto's not the best car, nor will you end up using it once you learn how to drive it. I have decided to start with the Ferrari and learn from my mistakes (and I've already made some BIG mistakes since I'm a noobie).

But once I learn to drive the Ferrari, the pay-off is going to be phenomenal! Once I learn from my mistakes, I'll already have the tools I need to do what I need to do properly and most effectively.

Having said that... some people can't afford to make the mistakes that I've made, so yea, they should get the, "error-free" buffers. But eventually, they'll want to advance and go to the next level. I feel that I have gotten pretty good with my buffer. I no longer screw up and mess up my paint.

Bottom line is this. If you want to be safe, get a DA buffer. But if you want to advance your "paint correction" skills, get the best quality buffer and learn how to use it. As I said before, you can always off-set the pad and effectively make your regular buffer, a DA or orbital buffer.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:40 PM.