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V6 (1994-2004) Mustangs Technical discussions on the 3.8L and 3.9L V6 torque monsters
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Old 03-22-2014, 12:31 PM   #1
razzgor
 
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Default Rear pads + rotors change questions

Hi all, I have an '04 automatic v6 stang that is in need of rear pads and rotors change.

I have decided to do it myself but I am not used to doing it as the process seems more complicated than doing Hondas/Toyotas so I have a couple questions.

1) Do you have to do a complete flush/bleed of the brakes if I am only changing out the rear pads?

2) I was watching a video showing how to do the replacement and right before the demonstrator put the new pads in, he put on some sort of brake bleeding kit onto the bleeder valve on the rear caliper? And then he used a spiral piston caliper compressor to remount the caliper onto the new brake pads.

Why is it necessary to unscrew the bleeder valve while remounting the caliper? Do I have to also mess with the master cylinder?

I'm good on everything besides understanding why I have to mess around with the brake fluid systems to replace the rotors and pads.

Any advice would be much appreciated!
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Old 03-23-2014, 10:50 AM   #2
Ogre
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Let's see if I can help you out:

1) No, you do not have to flush/bleed the brakes when only changing rotors and brake pads. The brake lines are not disconnected from the rear caliper, so is not necessary unless you are not getting good pressure to the rear brakes.

2) Not sure why the person put a brake bleeder kit on the bleeder valve just to press in the caliper piston when you can just take off the brake master cylinder cap and monitor the fluid level. Maybe he was going to bleed the brakes anyway.

3) when you compress the rear brake caliper piston to install the new pads, you must have a special tool. Most auto part stores rent/loan this tool. On the rears only, the caliper piston must be turned while being compressed back into the caliper. You could try all day to compress it without this tool, and it won't press in. (Ask me how I know as I found this out doing my first rear brake job). If you go to a parts store and ask for the tool, they will know what you need.

4) The only thing you need to do with the master cylinder is monitor it while you press in the caliper pistons to make sure it doesn't overflow with brake fluid. I use an old turkey baster to suck out/remove the fluid if there is too much.

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-23-2014, 12:12 PM   #3
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In a pinch, you can use a pair of needle nose pliers to turn/push the rear calipers open.
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Old 03-23-2014, 05:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilRoush View Post
In a pinch, you can use a pair of needle nose pliers to turn/push the rear calipers open.
You can if you got skills. I could never get enough pressure while turning and pressing to get the pistons to compress. Easier to just rent the tool for a few hours and then go get your money back. You are correct though...
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Old 03-24-2014, 06:34 PM   #5
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It makes it easier if you remove the rotor and reinstall the caliper. Then you can push against the caliper piston with more force as you turn the pliers/tool
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Old 03-24-2014, 06:34 PM
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