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5.0L (1979-1995) Mustang Technical discussions on 5.0 Liter Mustangs within. This does not include the 5.0 from the 2011 Mustang GT. That information is in the 2005-1011 section.

1992 Cooling/Coolant Issue

Old 04-30-2019, 08:38 AM
  #1  
john89gt
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Default 1992 Cooling/Coolant Issue

1992 LX 5.0 Bone Stock-First off, I want to thank everyone for the help with my ECC issue. Everything is working fine. So on to my new problem. Drove car to the muffler shop to replace mufflers. I got there and the car was a little warm. There was a little coolant discharge from the overflow. I assumed maybe the thermostat stuck from not being drove. So I had mufflers replaced and brought the car home on the trailer. Checked coolant added a little and drove the car around the block. Temperature started to rise above the 192° mark (enough that I was concerned), so I took the car home. I replaced the thermostat, filled with coolant and checked for leaks.Ran the car in the driveway and all looked well. I let the car reach 192° and the thermostat opened, water/coolant level dropped, so I topped off the radiator with coolant. At this point I went and retrieved my Lisle funnel to begin the burping process.I tried to bleed the air out with the Lisle funnel and the coolant overflowed from the funnel at times. The water would fluctuate and at times almost appear to boiling. I decide to let the car cool down, but when I shut the car off the water/coolant seemed to erupt like a volcano. After this, the car cooled down and I topped the coolant again and decided to try driving the car. I ventured out further and further until I had drove the car about 30-40 miles. No overheating issues at all. I returned home and parked the car. As I arrived the next afternoon, I said maybe I'll take the Mustang around the block. I raised the hood to check the coolant and the coolant was low. I topped the radiator off with coolant and let the car idle in the driveway while I was cleaning up in my garage. I noticed coolant under the car, so I opened the hood and coolant was discharging from the overflow tank. I opened the radiator cap and the coolant was low again. I've searched a few post on the forum, but can't seem to find a post/thread with anything closely related. One other thing to add is the car was bought by a 50 year old lady in 1992 off the dealer showroom. She owned and drove the car until I purchased it this year. Her son owned a automotive shop, so the maintenance and maintenance records on the this car are flawless. It looked as if the thermostat had been changed recently, and the radiator hoses look new. I own four fox body mustangs, so I'm not new to tinkering on them just at a loss on this issue. Which brings me to here, I'm reaching for a lifeline. TIA
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Old 04-30-2019, 02:50 PM
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Derf00
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Head gasket maybe. Take the plugs out and while you're at it, do a compression test on each cylinder. While the plugs are out look for any kind of dampness or rust forming on them which indicates a coolant leak into the cylinder. Also, how's the oil look? Any milkiness is a head/ head gasket issue as well.
Oh and make certain the thermostat was installed correctly. Jiggle valve at the top and the pointy end facing the radiator or 'UP" if it sits vertically. On some vehicles it's easy to install it backwards and get similar overheating issues.
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Old 05-02-2019, 12:16 PM
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the coolant level is going to be low in the radiator in the morning, that is normal. Do you still have the factory overflow jug with the sensor?
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Old 05-02-2019, 03:58 PM
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Derf00-Thanks for the help, I do appreciate it. So, I got in a little early yesterday afternoon and had time to do a little work. I pulled the plugs(couldn't find compression tester) and the plugs looked great. I acquired a block tester (the one with the blue fluid) and use it in the radiator. The fluid didn't turn yellow at all. The fluid stayed blue the whole time. I remembered reading something yesterday about a bad radiator cap may cause the water to boil in the overflow, If the radiator is not pressurized correctly. I had an old radiator sitting in the garage, so I replaced the other cap with this one. I knew the cap was good because it came off of one of my other mustangs. I topped off the radiator with some water and drove the car about 5 miles or so. So far, it didn't boil the coolant in the overflow. I hope to get a little time this afternoon to drive the car again. If you click on the link below, you can see exactly what i'm trying to describe happened when I tried to bleed the air from the system.

TrimDrip-Thanks again for the help, I do appreciate it. Yes, the car still has the factory overflow tank on the fan shroud. (coolant low in the morning is normal)- The coolant was low enough, that I couldn't see any in the radiator. This is not normal to any other mustang I own. I believe it was low on coolant from the coolant boiling out the day before. If you click on the link below, you can see exactly what i'm trying to describe happened when I tried to bleed the air from the system.

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Old 05-02-2019, 10:25 PM
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heads are coming off that motor. if you do try to replace the thermostat, drill a tiny a hole in the top of it to make all that air bleeding easier. and leave a few inches of air in the top of the radiator when filling. those guys were going to make a mess regardless with that much coolant

Last edited by TrimDrip; 05-03-2019 at 04:16 AM.
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Old 05-03-2019, 06:57 AM
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john89gt
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Originally Posted by TrimDrip View Post
heads are coming off that motor. if you do try to replace the thermostat, drill a tiny a hole in the top of it to make all that air bleeding easier. and leave a few inches of air in the top of the radiator when filling. those guys were going to make a mess regardless with that much coolant
TrimDrip-I did replace the thermostat a couple of days ago and I made sure the thermostat had the bleeder hole in it when I purchased the thermostat.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:12 AM
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i always had success with the napa tester.

what is the point of the funnel method?

the napa tester method is the correct method in my opinion. the coolant shouldn't be so high that it is spilling everywhere while you are burping it.

only time i use a funnel to fill an engine, is when it has no coolant in it. then i don't use the radiator to fill it, i actually fill the engine.

Last edited by TrimDrip; 05-03-2019 at 08:20 AM.
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Old 05-03-2019, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by TrimDrip View Post
i always had success with the napa tester.

what is the point of the funnel method?

the napa tester method is the correct method in my opinion. the coolant shouldn't be so high that it is spilling everywhere while you are burping it.

only time i use a funnel to fill an engine, is when it has no coolant in it. then i don't use the radiator to fill it, i actually fill the engine.
When you say Napa tester are you talking about the Napa block tester?

The funnel is to bleed the air out the radiator. Gets the water above the radiator to bleed the air out not to check for a Blown head gasket. The boiling action is from maybe the exhaust gases causing the water to boil while you’re trying to bleed the air out.
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Old 05-03-2019, 11:20 PM
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and amazingly, the car doesn't even have to warm up, it just doesn't lol

i think it is called a combustion leak tester. i haven't had to use it for a long time now. it was right every time though.


i still don't see why you need a funnel with boiling coolant in it. It shouldn't be that hard to get coolant up a to thermostat with a hole in it. know what i'm sayin?

Last edited by TrimDrip; 05-03-2019 at 11:40 PM.
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Old 05-04-2019, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by TrimDrip View Post
and amazingly, the car doesn't even have to warm up, it just doesn't lol

i think it is called a combustion leak tester. i haven't had to use it for a long time now. it was right every time though.


i still don't see why you need a funnel with boiling coolant in it. It shouldn't be that hard to get coolant up a to thermostat with a hole in it. know what i'm sayin?
Yes, I checked mine with a combustion leak tester and it did not turn yellow. I did drive the car last night about 60 miles round trip and still no boiling from the reservoir.
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