using "instant metal" to plug up holes?? - Page 3 - MustangForums.com


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Old 03-25-2005, 10:46 PM   #21  
Magiarn71
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Default RE: using "instant metal" to plug up holes??

The stuff you are talking about is an epoxy putty. Plumbers use it and it can be used for many different things. (I've used it to repair die counters in the stamping industry, but thats another matter.) I think theres better stuff to use than that, I've seen it crack before which probably wouldn't be good. I see the stuff we used is now available in different types for different metals, not just general purpose. (HERE) I know exactly what you're talking about, but I don't think I'd use it. If you want a smooth look, why not plug it with a short hex key bolt that leaves room at the top to cover with JB Weld?
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Old 03-26-2005, 01:24 AM   #22  
horatio102
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Default RE: using "instant metal" to plug up holes??

You're such a dumbass. You tell me to get over myself, yet you don't know what the hell you're talking about. I never said it wouldn't work. You made that up. You say that air is more forgiving than a liquid. You're wrong - air molecules are much smaller than most liquids, and can seep past a lot smaller crack or even through a porous material. Not that it matters, since I never said it wouldn't work. You think that a ground down glob of putty will be more attractive than a neatly machined pipe plug? Well that's subjective. I obviously don't share your sense of aesthetic. What I can tell you is that the putty is going to have a different density and hardness than the aluminum and it will make it more difficult to cleanly drill and tap a new hole. I'm glad you asked an ASE certified mechanic. From the section of ASE certification practice test that I have looked at I've come to the conclusion that anybody who cracks a book can pass the test. I'm not saying that he doesn't know what he's doing, but I'm saying it doesn't impress me any more than a backyard mechanic's opinion. Yeah, the stuff will work. But it'll be uglier than a brass fitting and it'll be much harder to reverse.

Ok so here we are, back at the second post in the thread. JB Weld, Stop Leak, Fix-A-Flat, rubber tape, duct tape... they're all ways to fix things. They're all hack fixes. I don't know why you decided to disregard my first reply, but from the outset you decided that I didn't know what you were talking about and therefore my smartass replies all lacked meritt. Do you think that because I can spell correctly and put sentences together that I don't know how to get my hands dirty? The substance you're talking about is an epoxy. Therefore it is similar to JB Weld, and when I said "JB Weld, and the like", the part "and the like" meant the paste-based stuff you're referring to. I, in fact, HAVE used similar stuff from Permatex designed to fill holes in gas tanks. It didn't work. I've also replaced copper pipe in residential plumbing that somebody had unsuccessfully attempted to repair with a putty epoxy. It's a lot of fun getting a call from your girlfriend at 10pm because she's got no water, only to find out that one of the housemates had attempted to fix the problem 6 hours earlier but gave up because it wasn't working and it was taking too long. Yeah, it took 20 minutes to get out there, another 30 minutes to figure out where the problem was, yet another 30 minutes to drive back to my place, get my torch and supplies and get back, then an hour to clean it all up and get it fixed. Had the housemate not attempted to put the bandaid on it, it would have been an easy fix and I would have been in bed at a reasonable time. So when somebody asks if they should use a putty to make a permanent repair, sure, I give a bit of a smartass response along with my opinion. But to be summarily dismissed without reason irritates me since clearly I've got more of a grasp of the concepts and repercussions than you.


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ORIGINAL: Demon_Mustang

Quote:
also you will probaly spend about the same amount of cash about 5.00 for the plugs or the nasty putty...
Um, yah, but I ALREADY have the "putty" from doing something else before, lol, so technically it's "free."


Horatio, get over yourself, there are people here who actually knows what I'm talking about specifically, and not the general category and even they say that it has been known to be used with no problems. So if you don't have any useful input, just keep it to yourself. I don't think using instant metal that can be tapped and SEAL cracks that can keep HOT FLUIDS UNDER PRESSURE from leaking through is anything like using a sock to replace a gas cap smartass. Air might not be a fluid, but it acts like it sometimes, and in FACT, air is MORE FORGIVING than fluids, so technically, if something can keep pressurized fluid from pushing through a crack, it can MORE than safely keep air that is unless LESS pressure from coming through.

Also, it'll sand down to be smooth instead of having the head of a brass bolt sticking out of my intake manifold, and it CAN BE DRILLED AND TAPPED if anyone wants to use nitrous later, and it was actually recommended by a ASE certified mechanic here, not as a first option, but I told him I already had it, so it's not like I'll be "wasting" my money on it, and he says he thinks it's perfectly fine, since it handles high temps and is capable of keeping pressurized fluid back. But I still thought of asking for more opinions from other people who might actually know.

"Now, since about a half dozen people have responded with nearly identical suggestions, why do you continue to wait for somebody who will give you what you want to hear? Either go ahead and put a ****ing bandaid over the hole, or listen to EVERYONE in here and fix it properly."

No no horatio, I'll wait for someone who have actually tried it or at the very least knows the exact specific thing I'm talking about. I've got "identicle" responses from people who are all speculating (including some which are even questioning what I'm talking about), and one smartass who is also speculating. Oh lookie there hor, someone who have used it has responded. He also suggested using a screw, but he did say it would work if I wanted to use it.

Oh look, good advice for a change, I'll take a look at a screw for the job since someone who actually knows and isn't full of himself gave me REAL advise, thanks birdman. And horatio, while I realize it's the same thing you said originally, he has actually used what I'm talking about (and hasn't had a completely horrible attitude about it) so it was better to hear it from him.
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Old 03-26-2005, 05:29 AM   #23  
Demon_Mustang
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Default RE: using "instant metal" to plug up holes??

Dbeck wrote:
"also, gases are usually more hazardous to keep under pressure than liquid fluids. because liquid fluids cannot be compressed, if they leak they will only produce droplets at the leak as opposed to a violent burst of pressurized gas for gaseous fluids.
hope it helps."

Absolutely, but the situations are not the same. The fluid inside the oil pan, the transmission, etc. are within a sealed container with no escape. While the air inside the intake has an incoming source, and an exiting route. There really isn't as much pressure build-up inside of the intake.

Oh, but I do have to say that pressure buildup from pressurized liquid is just as explosive actually, if not more. It would not just be droplets. Think about a dam, that springs a single leak, the entire thing will basically come down. Or think about a sealed tank of gasoline, being broiled in a fire, if you've seen one of the explosions that result from broiling flammable liquid within a sealed container, you'll definitely know what I'm talking about, probably the most spectacular explosions you'll EVER see.



horatio wrote:
"You're wrong - air molecules are much smaller than most liquids, and can seep past a lot smaller crack or even through a porous material."

Um, more forgiving as in not building as much pressure since air can be compressed... But perhaps if you have proper reading comprehension skills you would have known this already...

"Not that it matters, since I never said it wouldn't work. You think that a ground down glob of putty will be more attractive than a neatly machined pipe plug?"

Yah, you're right, I was thinking about painting nice little daisies in my engine too, so it would match the window treatments I have over my windows...

"I obviously don't share your sense of aesthetic."

In case it's not obvious yet, but aesthetics is about 15th in my list of priorities...

"What I can tell you is that the putty is going to have a different density and hardness than the aluminum and it will make it more difficult to cleanly drill and tap a new hole."

Not even sure if it's aluminum, could be made of a magnesium alloy for even less weight... (Although magnesium is highly combustible, but apparently a lot of intakes are made of it...)

"I'm glad you asked an ASE certified mechanic. From the section of ASE certification practice test that I have looked at I've come to the conclusion that anybody who cracks a book can pass the test."

That's funny, because I don't think anyone can just look at the test. Why don't you just take a peek at the MCAT tests while you're at it so you'll have a head start in studying for it?

Also, if it's such an easy thing, I don't know why everyone can't just get one and they no longer can have the sticker since it wouldn't really mean anything anymore to have ASE certified mechanics. But hey, if you're willing to officially claim now that you have taken a look at a certification test, and then say that any idiot monkey can become a ASE certified mechanic, then hey, more power to you, you're one brave man...

"I'm not saying that he doesn't know what he's doing, but I'm saying it doesn't impress me any more than a backyard mechanic's opinion."

Well, it impresses me more than YOUR opinion, I can tell you that much. I'm actually listening to some other opinions that don't think I should use it, because they actually sound knowledgeable and they are not a jackass about it. So if you think I just don't want to hear it, then well, you've been proven wrong, because I am hearing it, just not from you.

"Yeah, the stuff will work. But it'll be uglier than a brass fitting and it'll be much harder to reverse."

Well, I want to challenge what you said about how you never said it would not work. You compared using it to using a sock to replace a gas cap. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think a sock can really be used to replace a gas cap without all of your gas evaporating by the next morning, lol.

"but from the outset you decided that I didn't know what you were talking about"

um... but you didn't... JB Weld, to my knowledge, wasn't designed to seal fluid leaks. Well, they are a name brand, I admit, and make other products, but I know the common product they are known for and what you were thinking of when you said it. Basically you have no real experience with what I'm talking about, and just saying that you think that general category would not fix what I'm talking about. Ooohhh, great expert advice. I'm sorry, but if you would take someone's advice when that's all of what they could tell you, then you have a pretty low standard. Was it wrong for me to wait for someone who have actually used it on the exact application I'm talking about? I don't think so.

"Do you think that because I can spell correctly and put sentences together that I don't know how to get my hands dirty?"

LOL, what? Are you actually proud of your great linguistic ability? You think you can teach me a thing or two about grammar and semantics? Yah boy, you sound so fancy smancy I don't think you can get your hands dirty, you sound like an aristocrat! I don't even understand that statement, you sound like any common joe schmoe I've met. And speaking of spelling correctly, merit has only one t, hope that helps.

"The substance you're talking about is an epoxy. Therefore it is similar to JB Weld"

Um, not quite. Technically the only requirement for a substance to be called an epoxy is that for it to become effective, two inactive parts must be mixed to form one active part. A lot of body filler would fall under this designation, yet, you wouldn't use JB Weld to fill in a dent on your body would you?? Well, maybe if it's REALLY small, lol.

And what is this about repairing copper piping with putty?? Who makes one for that? I'd just whip out my trusty (ok, it's cheap and crappy) pipe cutter and replace that section of pipe, lol, had to do it before when adding a standing shower to my friend's house. Piping is pretty easy, it's to make it so that everything meets government safety standards that is difficult. The originally half bathroom was too small to have the light switch far enough from a water source, so I had to route it to the outside of the bathroom. I can already see kids messing with each other by switching off the lights while someone is inside taking a shower... *shakes head*

Also, which one is it? First you say that it would work, you just don't think it would look good, then you go on and "support" this by stating all the magical times you've seen it fail. Make up your mind buddy, don't be all fickle on me now man!

Anyway, don't you worry, other people have convinced me not to use it, so you don't have to lose any sleep over whether or not I will have an air leak in my intake while cruising on the freeway because it is so ugly that the intake would freak out and spit it out like a bad oyster, lol.
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Old 03-26-2005, 06:25 AM   #24  
horatio102
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Default RE: using "instant metal" to plug up holes??

Um, yeah.

You're a piece of work. You make arguements based off of your delusional interpretation of what I've said.

I said : Are you the type who sticks a sock in your fuel filler if you lose the cap?

You read : This putty stuff is as effective as putting a sock in your fuel filler to prevent evaporation.

The Edelbrock manifold is going to be aluminum.

Quote:
JB Weld, to my knowledge, wasn't designed to seal fluid leaks. Well, they are a name brand, I admit, and make other products, but I know the common product they are known for and what you were thinking of when you said it.
Do you? Do you really?
Quote:
Use J-B WELD as an adhesive, laminate, plug, filler, sealant, and electrical insulator. Squeeze out equal portions from the black and red tubes. Mix thoroughly. Clean surface to be bonded. Apply J-B WELD, and let it cure. That's all there is to it!

Like metal, J-B WELD can be formed, drilled, ground, tapped, machined, filled, sanded, and painted. It stays pliable for about 30 minutes after mixing, sets in 4-6 hours, and cures fully in 15-24 hours. It's water-proof; petroleum-, chemical-, and acid-resistent; resists shock, vibration, and extreme temperature fluctuations, and withstands temperatures up to 500° F. J-B WELD is super strong, non-toxic, and safe to use. Before it sets, you can clean up with soap and water

Tell me again how I don't know what I'm talking about.

Quote:
Basically you have no real experience with what I'm talking about, and just saying that you think that general category would not fix what I'm talking about. Ooohhh, great expert advice. I'm sorry, but if you would take someone's advice when that's all of what they could tell you, then you have a pretty low standard. Was it wrong for me to wait for someone who have actually used it on the exact application I'm talking about? I don't think so.
Again, you say I've never used it, no experience... you're lying. The general category that you refer to is comprised of the directly competing products that are used for the same applications. JB Weld has the 2 part tube as well as a stick. Permatex also has similar products. I think you just didn't like what I had to hear, and waited until more people supported my response before willing to accept it.

Quote:
That's funny, because I don't think anyone can just look at the test. Why don't you just take a peek at the MCAT tests while you're at it so you'll have a head start in studying for it?

Also, if it's such an easy thing, I don't know why everyone can't just get one and they no longer can have the sticker since it wouldn't really mean anything anymore to have ASE certified mechanics. But hey, if you're willing to officially claim now that you have taken a look at a certification test, and then say that any idiot monkey can become a ASE certified mechanic, then hey, more power to you, you're one brave man...
You do know how to read, right? I said "practice test", not the actual test. Yeah, you got me. I added an extra 't' to merit. Perhaps it's because Merritt is a town north of here, and it's also the name of a friend's roommate.

So do you want to tell me again how I have never used anything like what you're inquiring about? Maybe you'd like to tell me I said it wouldn't work, yet again?
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Old 03-26-2005, 10:52 PM   #25  
Gaspi101
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Default RE: using "instant metal" to plug up holes??

Alas, Horatio!
Quote:
...and therefore my smartass replies all lacked meritt. Do you think that because I can spell correctly and put sentences together...
---

just a little note....there is only one t in merit. Also, by the look of this post, both of you have spent a considerable amount of time embittered by each other, hoping to come out in the end with the bigger pinchila. Remember the words of your noble friend--What a piece of work is man!-
Live and let live. Allow those that think you're ignorant to remain thinking so--in trying to demonstrate you are not, you invite frustration and emptiness to all the seconds you spent pouring over the computer trying to get him to concede. Just my advice: Put some music, grab a beer, and get under the hood of your car. Feel the peace!--let it all go. Good luck!

Gaspi
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Old 03-27-2005, 04:00 AM   #26  
96SilverLT1
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Default RE: using "instant metal" to plug up holes??

JB weld
Liquid steal
Quick steal
super seal
or any other 2 part epoxy of any other name is CRAP. They market it to people who A: have no idea what they are doing or B: are too cheep to do it right. 99/100 times it will never ever ever work. There is no epoxy that will set up as hard as molton steal. It just isn't going to happen. Fix the job right once or fix it wrong 5 times. It's up to you.
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