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Voltage regulator wiring

Old 06-25-2019, 03:40 PM
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scasey18
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Default Voltage regulator wiring

I have a 1995 Mustang that wont charge. We found out that the voltage regulator wiring could be bad. We change the alternator, battery, and computer. Is there anything else that could be wrong with it??
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Old 06-25-2019, 10:48 PM
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imp
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Originally Posted by scasey18 View Post
I have a 1995 Mustang that wont charge. We found out that the voltage regulator wiring could be bad. We change the alternator, battery, and computer. Is there anything else that could be wrong with it??
There are several Fuse Links built into the wiring harness which protect it as well as the alternator against overloading. If a Fuse Link "opens" it's circuit, the alternator will not charge the battery, or run the car.

These links are usually located near the underhood fuse box, which is called the Battery Junction Box. They are usually not taped into the harness, and are visible as slightly fatter than most wires, and about 4 inches long. If one fails, it's special insulation usually bubbles a bit and turns brown or black. Look for that problem.
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