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Old 03-21-2011, 01:17 PM   #11
PaulS
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The "resto-mod" movement is just Fords way of saying that "hotrods" are ok too.
This is nothing new, we have had people making their cars better, faster, lower, higher, narrower and wider since the model T.
I am a hotrodder; any car I buy will be modified to fit me and my personality. I do promise that I will not buy a car that is iconic or a superlative example of a model that is rare and collectable. I will let you restore your car in a way that meets your desires as long as you allow me to modify mine in a way that pleases me.
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Old 03-21-2011, 01:40 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Iunderstang! View Post
As a new guy in the hobby, I am like a dry sponge, learning and absorbing history, technical data, repair & Maint. etc.... I've been catching up on a lot of articles and Forum threads and quickly noticed how many owners opt to restore their Mustangs as restomods, instead of factory original. I can't help but wonder how many Stangs get the Restomod treatment vs those restored to original, historic specs, and if the tendency is to increase. The Aftermarket for restomod parts and accessories is very strong, and as new generations discover the hobby and adapt it to their tastes and preferences, aren't we loosing more and more original cars with each passing year to the Restomod movement? Do these cars loose value more than an original concourse-restored car?
My opinion is, as much as I like many restomods, I don't like to see a near-original Mustang in good shape (low rust, good original engine) get torn appart and restored as a restomod. But this is my personal opinion. Not to undermine the restomod movement in any way. Please remember this is the opinion of a person new to the hobby.
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Well, since I'm young (18) I'll give you my opinion. I am not a fan of complete resto-mods, it's just not my thing. However, I've always liked the old mustangs and when I finally get one, it will be changed to my liking (unless I come across an all original GT or something). Mod the engine, 4-wheel disc brakes, t-5, etc... I will keep the exterior and interior as close as possible to stock, but will probably change a few things.

I think most people do mild restoration tweaks because they love the look of the classics but also need the dependability/safety of modern technology. Let's face it, a 40+ year old car with no power steering, no power brakes, all wheel drum brakes, etc... can't keep up with modern vehicles. I want my mustang to keep the classic look but be able to compete with the modern cars as far as driving quality goes.
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Old 03-21-2011, 02:40 PM   #13
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I think most people do mild restoration tweaks because they love the look of the classics but also need the dependability/safety of modern technology. Let's face it, a 40+ year old car with no power steering, no power brakes, all wheel drum brakes, etc... can't keep up with modern vehicles. I want my mustang to keep the classic look but be able to compete with the modern cars as far as driving quality goes.
Well said. Classic looks, modern driveability and safety.

Now, what really gets my goat is when somebody calls their car a 'resto-mod' that is all 'mod' with little or no 'resto'. A true resto-mod is a restoration with modernization, not a bunch of aftermarket parts bolted to a rust-bucket.
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Old 03-21-2011, 05:29 PM   #14
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Ehh,, Ford mad millions of "concurs" correct Mustangs.... we wont run out anytime soon.

I like a nicely done restoration or a nice survivor, but when it comes right down to it I find some of the lengths some folks go to stay concurs, well,,, ****...

Besides, I like DRIVERS, a dual master cylinder, and electronic ignition are a couple of mods that just makes sense for most any driver....

Concurs correct cars all too often turn into garage queens..... IMO,,, a car that can't be driven ain't worth a damn.
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Old 03-22-2011, 08:21 PM   #15
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Are you in the Hobby to re-live the past? Or perhaps you see preserving the car as it was when new, your contribution to history? Don't take me wrong, I am not trying to be snide nor disrespectful. I have observed there are two main types of car lovers: Those who freeze time, and those who drive/modify their cars for fun.
If you buy a car as an investment, it stays parked. Perhaps loved, but certainly un-used. There will come a time when the supply of restorable Mustangs will be exhausted, just as what happened with the Model A. I, for one, choose to drive my 65. I've updated it with a modern driveline, brakes and steering. It is much more enjoyable as a driver now than it was stock. And isn't the Hobby about enjoying your car?
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Old 03-26-2011, 06:01 AM   #16
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I have observed there are two main types of car lovers: Those who freeze time, and those who drive/modify their cars for fun.
If you buy a car as an investment, it stays parked. Perhaps loved, but certainly un-used. There will come a time when the supply of restorable Mustangs will be exhausted, just as what happened with the Model A. I, for one, choose to drive my 65. I've updated it with a modern driveline, brakes and steering. It is much more enjoyable as a driver now than it was stock. And isn't the Hobby about enjoying your car?
I will try to bring mine back to factory look and feel, as much as I can and my budget allows. I'll try to strike a balance between expense and car value. I not only want my car to look, but to also feel like a 1967 Stang felt when it came out of the Metuchen, NJ assembly line, bad braking, unsafe, and all. The way I see it, the more 67 Stangs are cut up and modified beyond the threshold where you can bring it back, the more valuable my car will be. I am not sure if I'll be able to bring it to concours level, or how much value it will hold, but I'll do it for the fun of it. I'll drive it on weekends and enjoy the heck out of it with my family on the many weekend classic car meets at home.
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Old 04-23-2011, 09:09 AM   #17
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The big problem is the shear number of 2 barrel, 3 speed coupes that were produced. You can look at any car show and pretty soon you get tired of seeing the same car over and over. How many original Mustang coupes do we need?
Putting in a larger engine, disk brakes, newer gauge pack or electronics makes the car fit the owner better. It will never be worth what a similar concourse original car will be but that is not what a reso-mod is about. A restomod is about driving a car that satisfies your own desires. There is already a lot of historical cars mine will be "different".
The other side of that coin is I would never put enough money in a triple collision survivor, 2 barrel, three speed, V8 Mustang to restore it. I would have $150000 in a car worth $15000. For a lot of work and a little money I can make the car fit me better than the original did.

This....

If you fine an all original, keep it original....Most of us find one that has already been molested, so we stop the pain and bring it back to something that can be appreciated.
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Old 04-26-2011, 11:43 PM   #18
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I remember years ago when the restored 1920-1941 cars brought more than the hotrods. Now you get vastly more for a hotrod than you do for a perfectly restored car of the same vintage. Look at what a well built fiberglass body 32 Ford goes for compared to a stock all original 32 Ford. Its a big difference. Both are still expensive, but the rods bring much more.

Then it was the 50s cars that brought more restored, now its the rodded versions bringing the big bucks. The muscle cars are just starting to go the same route, restored cars are starting to level off and the modified cars are increasing in value.

As mentioned here before, there were millions of Mustangs built in the 60s. It took until the 80s for a million Corvettes to be built. Mustangs are everywhere, they were intended to be cheap transportation so the younger generation of baby boomers could afford them. This means what is rare for Mustangs is almost common for other cars. In the Pontiac world, something with 15,000 examples is not a big deal, but with Mustangs that is kinda low production. 697 Trans Ams built in 1969. 276 Formula HO 455s built in 1972. 5000 GTOs built in 1972 and not that many more in 1970. Those kinds of figures are extremely rare in Mustangs, you are talking BOSS 429s and GT500KRs, not basic V8 Coupes.

There is no shortage of Mustangs, despite the serious rust issues they have. Mustangs will be the first 60s and 70s vehicles to have modded cars bringing more than concours perfect examples, simply because there are so damn many of them. Already it is difficult to restore a Mustang and get your money back, particularly if you pay to have the work done, but still if you do all the work yourself. The 71 in my sig will never be worth what I put in it if I put it back stock, but with the right mods I can make a nice profit from it if I sell it.
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Old 04-27-2011, 07:56 PM   #19
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I bought my car about four years ago from the original owner. It came with a written history of every repair and oil change and even written diaries of trips he had taken in it. There was a box in the trunk with every license plate which had ever been on the car (from back when we got new plates every year). I even have the orginal window sticker and loan papers. There was 1965 road map in the glove compartment. The car had never been dented and the original interior was not worn. I took the car apart to repair a lot of midwestern rust but I replaced nothing. I repaired, which was more time consuming. It has power steering and I am not bothered by drum brakes since (at age 59) I grew up with them. I drive this car every chance I get, including driving it to work. For a car this original, modding it would have been unthinkable to me. One the other hand, I like modded cars too. If this car had not been so original I would have replaced some body panels, added disc brakes, etc. To each their own. It is your car. Do what makes you happy.
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Old 04-27-2011, 08:30 PM   #20
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The way I see it, if you have a car and look at it everyday but never drive it, then you cack off, what enjoyment is there in that?
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Old 04-27-2011, 08:30 PM
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