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Old 03-30-2012, 02:52 PM   #1
67fstbackresto
 
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Default Sheet metal - Where should I start?

I am looking at replacing a bunch of metal on a 67 fastback. I have floor pans, both front frame rails, aprons, radiator support, most if not all of the rear frame rails, trunk floor, and quarters. Where is the best place to start on the replacement? What is the best order to go in?
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:03 PM   #2
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Honestly, for that much stuff I personally would start with a frame fixture, or purchase the $2500 pre-made chassis and build out from that.

I changed out my rear trunk brace, drop offs, rear frame ends, transition panel, one piece floor, front frame extensions,the tunnel X-Member, added torque boxes, one wheelhouse and a major repair on the other and did toe board repairs on the edges, all over one winter.

I started at the back and worked my way forward. I had my car on a 4 post life for 7 months, I used string and plumb bobs to locate reference points that I made before I cut anything. I was lucky that my front frames were good and my rockers were solid.

If I ever do it again I will just build a fixture that sits on my lift and work from that, I may even just build a new chassis and move the good bits over to it.

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Old 03-31-2012, 12:01 PM   #3
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I did that with the plumb-bob method. It worked alright. I've got a thread in here, ...somewhere. Kinda' nice to see something done before you actually do it yourself.
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Old 03-31-2012, 02:40 PM   #4
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Short of having a jig, level the car FIRMLY on 4 HEAVY DUTY jack stands, (like 7 or 8 ton stands, with a broad base) measure and mark. Work on one frame rail at a time, tack it in and check the fit if the fender, rad support etc. Do the other frame rail the same way. Mock the car together, check fit and then weld it up.

A jig would be nice, but careful attention to fit etc. after firmly tacking but BEFORE WELDING, you can do a good job without one. The idea is to end up with a car that looks good and functions as desired...

I haven't studied the factory tolerance of Mustangs from this era, but for a 70s Chevelle, the acceptable tolerance for the frame measurements exceeded 1/4" on many dimensions. It's not rocket science, it is a lot of common sense and learning to be patient before welding anything in permanent.
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Old 04-01-2012, 01:36 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bent metal View Post
I did that with the plumb-bob method. It worked alright. I've got a thread in here, ...somewhere. Kinda' nice to see something done before you actually do it yourself.
Haha take it from this guy, he knows it all!
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Old 04-01-2012, 04:07 PM   #6
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Thanks for the advice. I am thinking of making a very simple jig that I can ensure is completely level to get my measurements off of. I'm not sure how level my cement really is. I have also found all the measurements and I am planning on clecoing everything before welding it in. I know this is not something I want to screw up.
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:59 AM   #7
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Im curious to how much more would it cost to buy the premade chasis. Would it be worth the extra cash to have some less welding and measuring. Anybody know of any one going with a "new" chasis are they to specs, or is it like any other reproduction part where you have to fight to fit things in place. Im in the same boat as 67fstbackresto but I wont be able to actually pull the trigger till the end of next year, hopefully prices will drop.
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Old 04-02-2012, 10:05 AM   #8
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One guy purchased one, started a thread and then could not figure out how to get the body on the new chassis and the thread died.
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Old 04-02-2012, 10:56 AM   #9
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One guy purchased one, started a thread and then could not figure out how to get the body on the new chassis and the thread died.
That's depressing, lol
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Old 04-02-2012, 11:15 AM   #10
zmetalmilitia
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I made a frame jig used to have the car sit in place. Once I cut a piece out, the jig would hold the car in place and I fit the new piece into place. This worked well especially when I replace my frame rails.

The frame rails are probabalt a good place to start. A lot of stuff attaches to the frame rails.
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Old 04-02-2012, 11:15 AM
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1965, adding, brand, build, fastback, floor, ford, frame, jig, make, metal, mustang, pan, reproduction, sheet, trunk

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