California’s Largest All-Ford Show Comes to Angels Stadium, April 14

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Fabulous Ford Forever

Fabulous Fords Forever celebrates 55 years of the Mustang and the 50th anniversary of the Mach 1 and Boss.

If you are making plans to hit major Ford car shows around the country, you will want to book your travel to Anaheim, California for the weekend of April 14. On that Sunday, the 34th annual Fabulous Fords Forever show will be held at Angels Stadium, serving as the largest all-Ford show on the West Coast with scores of vehicles from Ford, Lincoln and Mercury.

Best of all, if you don’t have a Ford, Lincoln or Mercury show vehicle or you live too far away to get your car to the event, admission for spectators is free, as is parking. Parking for show vehicles is $45 and there is a limited number of spaces that will sell out, so anyone interested in showing their vehicle will want to act quickly. As for everyone else, if you love FoMoCo products and you are going to be in SoCal on April 14, you want to make plans to stop by Angels Stadium between 7:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.

Classic Ford Mustang Drag Car

Registration Details

If you have a Ford, Lincoln or Mercury vehicle that you believe is worthy of filling one of the spots at the Fabulous Fords Forever event, you will want to get signed up and paid up right away. There is a limited number of spots available at $45 per vehicle and they do plan to sell out by the end of this month, so there is no vehicle registration on the day of the show. The gates open at 7:00 a.m. and all vehicles are required to be in by 10:00 a.m., but vehicles begin lining up well before dawn on the morning of the show. Once in, vehicles are required to stay until 3:00 p.m. and tow vehicles are not permitted on the show grounds, but they do have a limited amount of trailer parking in a nearby location.

Ford Show Vehicles Lined Up

Since spectator admission is free, your $45 vehicle registration fee covers your car or truck and whoever comes to the show with you. There is also free on-site parking for spectators who do not have show vehicles, so it costs nothing to check out the event as a spectator.

Key Rules

Fabulous Fords Forever is a huge show and as anyone who spends much time at car shows knows, there are plenty of rules that need to be observed. For starters, you cannot bring your dog, a big tent or an aerial video drone. You are not permitted to save spots, so if you want to park with friends or members of your car club, you need to line up and enter together.

Most significantly, “show boards” and other display enhancements are not permitted. This is the oddest of their rules, as things like mirrors under the sides of the car or an ornate display board with information on the vehicle are common items at every car show. They also don’t allow any “for sale” signs, so if you are planning to take your Ford, Lincoln or Mercury vehicle to sell, you won’t be able to hang a sign in the window with information. Notice that the pictures of past shows have vendor tents, and we would guess that vendors will still have tents, but the organizers dont want people putting up flimsy tents that are going to blow around and damage other cars.

Ford Mustang Lineup

However, if you want to show off your new or classic Ford vehicle or just check out the biggest collection of FoMoCo show vehicles anywhere on the West Coast, this is one event that you don’t want to miss.

Show Images: Fabulous Fords Forever Facebook Page

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A lifetime automotive expert, diehard Dodge fan, and respected auto journalist for over 10 years, Patrick Rall is highly experienced in the automotive world. He has clocked in time as an auto mechanic, longtime drag racer and now auto journalist who contributes to nearly a dozen popular websites dedicated to fellow enthusiasts.

“Before I was old enough to walk, my dad was taking me to various types of racing events, from local drag racing to the Daytona 500,” says Rall. “He owned a repair shop and had a variety of performance cars when I was young, but by the time I was 16, he was ready to build me my first drag car: a 1983 Dodge Mirada that ran low 12s. I spent 10 years traveling around the country, racing with my dad by my side. While we live in different areas of the country, my dad still drag races at 80 years old in the car that he built when I was 16. Meanwhile, I race other vehicles, including my 2017 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat and my 1972 Dodge Demon 340.

“Although I went to college for accounting, my time in my dad’s shop growing up allowed me the knowledge to spend time working as a mechanic before getting my accounting degree, at which point I worked in the office of a dealership group,” adds Rall. “While I was working in the accounting world, I continued racing and taking pictures of cars at the track. Over time, I began showing off those pictures online and that led to my writing.

“Ten years ago, I left the accounting world to become a full-time automotive writer and I am living proof that if you love what you do, you will never ‘work’ a day in your life. I love covering the automotive industry and everything involved with the job. I was fortunate to turn my love of the automotive world into a hobby that led to an exciting career, with my past of working as a mechanic and as an accountant in the automotive world provides me with a unique perspective of the industry.

“My experience drag racing for more than 20 years coupled with a newfound interest in road racing over the past decade allows me to push performance cars to their limit, while my role as a horse stable manager gives me vast experience towing and hauling with all of the newest trucks on the market today.

“Being based on Detroit, I never miss the North American International Auto Show, the Woodward Dream Cruise and Roadkill Nights, along with spending plenty of time raising hell on Detroit’s Woodward Avenue with the best muscle car crowd in the world.”

“Before I was old enough to walk, my dad was taking me to various types of racing events, from local drag racing to the Daytona 500,” says Rall. “He owned a repair shop and had a variety of performance cars when I was young, but by the time I was 16, he was ready to build me my first drag car: a 1983 Dodge Mirada that ran low 12s. I spent 10 years traveling around the country, racing with my dad by my side. While we live in different areas of the country, my dad still drag races at 80 years old in the car that he built when I was 16. Meanwhile, I race other vehicles, including my 2017 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat and my 1972 Dodge Demon 340.

“Although I went to college for accounting, my time in my dad’s shop growing up allowed me the knowledge to spend time working as a mechanic before getting my accounting degree, at which point I worked in the office of a dealership group,” adds Rall. “While I was working in the accounting world, I continued racing and taking pictures of cars at the track. Over time, I began showing off those pictures online and that led to my writing.

“Ten years ago, I left the accounting world to become a full-time automotive writer and I am living proof that if you love what you do, you will never ‘work’ a day in your life. I love covering the automotive industry and everything involved with the job. I was fortunate to turn my love of the automotive world into a hobby that led to an exciting career, with my past of working as a mechanic and as an accountant in the automotive world provides me with a unique perspective of the industry.

“My experience drag racing for more than 20 years coupled with a newfound interest in road racing over the past decade allows me to push performance cars to their limit, while my role as a horse stable manager gives me vast experience towing and hauling with all of the newest trucks on the market today.

“Being based on Detroit, I never miss the North American International Auto Show, the Woodward Dream Cruise and Roadkill Nights, along with spending plenty of time raising hell on Detroit’s Woodward Avenue with the best muscle car crowd in the world.”

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