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Old 02-27-2005, 02:37 PM   #1  
artisan00
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Default when to replace discs/calipers

hey, i have a question about brakes. i had to get a tire put on (pothole busted the right rear) and when the guy was putting the wheel on the car (id have done it myself buti needed to have it mounted and balanced anyway so i just had the guy do it) he told me he thught me brakes were too 'low' . he didnt speak the best english so he didnt really explain so well, but i trhink he was trying to tell me that the calipers were getting to close to the rotors. how do i tell if they have to be replaced? (and what would need to be replaced)

and assuming they would need to be replaced, any info on brakes would be nice since i dont know much about it. the thing is, if its only the discs, then my dad or uncle could probably do it, but if anything else is entailed, i dunno.

all i know is im scared to drive now since i dont want to completly screw up the calipers or rotors if they rub too much or something.

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Old 02-27-2005, 03:18 PM   #2  
Higgie
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Default RE: when to replace discs/calipers

My brake experiences:

I have done my own brake jobs for many years, so I will share my limited experience. First and foremost, needed a brake job is not a "guess". The shoes or disc pads, will either have lining left or not. This is a visual check, and is pretty obvious. Some linings are bonded on, while others also have rivets. This is important to know, since the rivits stick up and will ruin the drum or rotor surface while lining is still there. I usually go through two sets of front disc's prior to needing a rear brake job. This is no doubt related to the fact that like 2/3 of your stopping power is in the front of the vehicle.

I did brakes on my 96 Dakota, then 100 miles later when I took it in for new tires, was told I needed brakes. I asked to talk to the shop owner, and said....funny thing those brakes only have 100 miles on them. He had some story of confusion...but the bottom line is, they wanted to charge me for something I obviously didn't need. Beware !!!

Rotors and drums should always be machined (turned) before new pads are put on. This is a small expense and can improve braking preformace a lot. Todays brakes build so much heat, that the rotors usually warp a bit, and the machining will true them again. This helps restore smooth braking. All the rotors and drums I have had turned (at a lot of the shops that sell pads, and autoparts), were marked with minimum safe thickness. Again, a simple measurement not a guess. The shop has a special brake measurement caliber that makes this easy, at home a regular verier caliber doesn't work, since there is often a high spot, of edge that sticks up on the outside of the rotor or drum, where the pad didn't touch. Thus, no wear, and a high spot.

Best of luck. Remember...brakes are important. I would rather coast to a stop without power anyday. Verses no brakes when you need them !!!
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Old 02-27-2005, 04:05 PM   #3  
Derf00
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Default RE: when to replace discs/calipers


Quote:
ORIGINAL: Higgie

My brake experiences:

I have done my own brake jobs for many years, so I will share my limited experience. First and foremost, needed a brake job is not a "guess". The shoes or disc pads, will either have lining left or not. This is a visual check, and is pretty obvious. Some linings are bonded on, while others also have rivets. This is important to know, since the rivits stick up and will ruin the drum or rotor surface while lining is still there. I usually go through two sets of front disc's prior to needing a rear brake job. This is no doubt related to the fact that like 2/3 of your stopping power is in the front of the vehicle.

I did brakes on my 96 Dakota, then 100 miles later when I took it in for new tires, was told I needed brakes. I asked to talk to the shop owner, and said....funny thing those brakes only have 100 miles on them. He had some story of confusion...but the bottom line is, they wanted to charge me for something I obviously didn't need. Beware !!!

Rotors and drums should always be machined (turned) before new pads are put on. This is a small expense and can improve braking preformace a lot. Todays brakes build so much heat, that the rotors usually warp a bit, and the machining will true them again. This helps restore smooth braking. All the rotors and drums I have had turned (at a lot of the shops that sell pads, and autoparts), were marked with minimum safe thickness. Again, a simple measurement not a guess. The shop has a special brake measurement caliber that makes this easy, at home a regular verier caliber doesn't work, since there is often a high spot, of edge that sticks up on the outside of the rotor or drum, where the pad didn't touch. Thus, no wear, and a high spot.

Best of luck. Remember...brakes are important. I would rather coast to a stop without power anyday. Verses no brakes when you need them !!!
Bravo! I couldn't have said it any better myself! The only thing I might add is based on my personal experience with my Mustang. The OEM pads have the antisqueal shims 'permanently' attached to the pad using pressfit nubs. I found aftermarket pads that use nothing but 'glue' to hold these shims on worthless as they slide off the back of the pad when they heat up and end up creating a ton of noise. I would recommend going with a pad, OEM or other, that has these shims 'permanently' attached to the pad. Less likely-hood of having to tear the brakes down again to fix the squeal.
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Old 02-27-2005, 04:18 PM   #4  
Higgie
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Default RE: when to replace discs/calipers


Quote:
ORIGINAL: Derf00


Quote:
ORIGINAL: Higgie

My brake experiences:

I have done my own brake jobs for many years, so I will share my limited experience. First and foremost, needed a brake job is not a "guess". The shoes or disc pads, will either have lining left or not. This is a visual check, and is pretty obvious. Some linings are bonded on, while others also have rivets. This is important to know, since the rivits stick up and will ruin the drum or rotor surface while lining is still there. I usually go through two sets of front disc's prior to needing a rear brake job. This is no doubt related to the fact that like 2/3 of your stopping power is in the front of the vehicle.

I did brakes on my 96 Dakota, then 100 miles later when I took it in for new tires, was told I needed brakes. I asked to talk to the shop owner, and said....funny thing those brakes only have 100 miles on them. He had some story of confusion...but the bottom line is, they wanted to charge me for something I obviously didn't need. Beware !!!

Rotors and drums should always be machined (turned) before new pads are put on. This is a small expense and can improve braking preformace a lot. Todays brakes build so much heat, that the rotors usually warp a bit, and the machining will true them again. This helps restore smooth braking. All the rotors and drums I have had turned (at a lot of the shops that sell pads, and autoparts), were marked with minimum safe thickness. Again, a simple measurement not a guess. The shop has a special brake measurement caliber that makes this easy, at home a regular verier caliber doesn't work, since there is often a high spot, of edge that sticks up on the outside of the rotor or drum, where the pad didn't touch. Thus, no wear, and a high spot.

Best of luck. Remember...brakes are important. I would rather coast to a stop without power anyday. Verses no brakes when you need them !!!
Bravo! I couldn't have said it any better myself! The only thing I might add is based on my personal experience with my Mustang. The OEM pads have the antisqueal shims 'permanently' attached to the pad using pressfit nubs. I found aftermarket pads that use nothing but 'glue' to hold these shims on worthless as they slide off the back of the pad when they heat up and end up creating a ton of noise. I would recommend going with a pad, OEM or other, that has these shims 'permanently' attached to the pad. Less likely-hood of having to tear the brakes down again to fix the squeal.
You're makin me blush>>. I forgot about the anti-rattlet pads, good advice there. I have had decent luck with the permatex spray-on. Only I make an afternoon of it, and put three heavy coats on, and install when its dry.
:-)
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